Badger Pond Shop Tours
A Tour of George (the Colonel) Dart's new Shop
 
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Hello Friends, and welcome to my new shop, where I can be found most of the time wood working, entertaining, or enjoying a home brewed ale. I have to thank most of my kids for moving me in here and making the space needed for function and comfort. Most particularly, my thanks to #1 son George, and #3 son Ken for their effots in wall building, sheetrocking, plumming, and wiring.

command center

This is my Command Center and chair where most of my thinking is performed. The counter top is about 16 feet long and covers two base cabinets. A hollow chisel mortiser has since been situated in the middle of the counter space, and the two cabinets have been moved apart. The drawers and shelf space accommodate my hand and small power tools such as sanders, drills, hand files, rasps, etc.

The boxes are mostly of oak or pine, are shop made using finger joint construction and a table saw jig. The assembly table beneath the radio also accommodates shelves and drawers. Casters allow me to position it anywhere in the room.

wall space

I prefer to use plywood in lieu of pegboard, and most of the wall space in both shop rooms reflects this preference. I think plywood gives a desirable "warm" look. This room measures 13 1/2' X 17 1/2'. Illumination is from 4 rows of double flourescent lights, with two fixtures per row. Since I suffer from diabetic retinopathy, I need very bright light to see and work in.

jointer

My jointer and lathe share space on one end of the large room. The jointer (Bridgewood 6") sits on a Wood Magazine inspired mobile base, as do almost all of my "stationary" power tools. The lathe is a Harbor Freight tool, only occasionally used and very suitable for my turning needs. The lathe stand is shelved and carries various table saw jigs and other tools.

I buiilt a caddy on the end of the stand for the lathe chisels to keep them handy for use, but out of the way. Behind the lathe wall in the laundry area, lurk my A-frame for pipe and bar clamps and compressor.

bandsaw

The bandsaw and sanding center occupy an area diaginally across the room from the Command Center. The DC drop services both machines, as well as providing capability for floor sweep up. My DC is behind the wall and is plummed through the soffet, which also contains a bank of high hat adjustable task lights. These illuminate my other stationary equipment.

table saw

When we plumbed for dust collection, we chose to limit ourselves to one run with four drops, and use a couple of those drops with quick disconnects to service more than one tool. I have found that arrangement very effecient in terms of DC, and increased shop flexibility. Flexhoses are plenty long enough so that any tool can be rolled out to the middle of the room as necessary for use.

The router table and cabinet have handles attached and can be carried away for out-of-shop use. The shelved stand is large enough to be home to my P+C 7518, 690 bases, accessories, and laminate trimmer, all in obligated home buiilt containers. In addition to the bit and accessory drawers, thre router table cabinet is of plywood, and also contains bits too wide or long for the storage drawers. Note the spring clamps and hand screws suspended behind the task lights.

sawblade...and me

If you look closely, you will see an image on the saw blade. It is actually a self-engraved portrait of Scott Whiting, who provides an engraved picture of himself on every blade he sharpens. :<) I'm in good company, and appreciate the fine art work.

finishing room...and me

This is my finishing room which measures 10 1/2" X 13". My Neanderthal Shrine and cabinetmaker's bench are at the end of the room. I use this space also for drill press, paint locker, and for grinding, polishing, and sharpening tasks. This is the quiet side of the shop. I have not run dust collection to it. Overhead illumination is from three banks of double flourescent fixtures, two fixtures per bank. Its plenty bright.

paint locker

The paint locker is actually a built in shelf unit against the wall and between the Neanderthal bench and the door. I have shelves mounted on the back of the door. When the door is open, the locker is closed.

here's lookin' at you, kid

Thanks for visiting and come again.

George
mois

Originally posted 15 February 2003

wb date